2-year full time postdoc in Baltic Sea Ecosystem Change

A 2-year full time postdoctoral position  in Baltic Sea Ecosystem Change is available starting 1 February 2018 (or as per agreement) at the Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences (DEEP). More information on the project and how to apply below (see also a second postdoc opportunity on Molecular Baltic Sea Ecology at the same department).

The project “Temporal change in Baltic Sea coastal, benthic ecosystems” aims to make use of an ‘unearthed treasure’ of data and archived samples from the Swedish national yearly monitoring program of phytobenthic communities in the Baltic Sea paired with existing data on abiotic factors and fish community surveys. The two main research questions are: How have coastal benthic communities along the Baltic Sea coast changed over the past 25 years, and to what extent are those changes driven by abiotic forcing vs. changes in trophic interactions? Have blue mussel diets changed in response to climate or nutrient loading; are changes occurring in both the Baltic proper and in the Bothnian Sea; and what are the consequences of altered diet for mussel body condition?

As most of the data exists, the focus of the work will be on isotope analyses of historical samples and/or causal time series analyses (e.g. multivariate ARIMA analyses).

The successful candidate will work in a team, that apart from the project leader Agnes Karlson, consist of Assoc. Prof Johan Eklöf and Dr Susanne Qvarfordt and Dr. Ellen Schagerström (at DEEP) but also with researchers at the  Baltic Sea Centre and Department of Geology (Stockholm University).

The position involves full-time employment for a maximum of two years, with the possibility of extension under special circumstances. Start date 2018-02-01 or as per agreement. Applicants are expected to hold a doctoral degree. The degree should have been completed no more than three years before the deadline for applications. An older degree may be acceptable under special circumstances, which may involve sick leave, parental leave, clinical attachment, elected positions in trade unions, or similar.

Apply at the Stockholm university webpage:

http://www.su.se/english/about/working-at-su/jobs?rmlang=UK&rmpage=job&rmjob=4291

At the Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences at Stockholm University research and education are conducted in an international environment. The subject areas are marine and plant ecology, ecotoxicology, plant physiology and plant systematics. Some of the research has direct environmental and societal relevance and the approach is often broad and interdisciplinary. About 150 people work at the department, of which ca 60 are teachers and researchers and 50 are PhD students.

Further information about the position can be obtained from Assistant Professor Agnes Karlsson (project leader), agnes.karlson@su.se.

 

See also Postdoctoral Fellow in Baltic Sea Molecular Ecology

http://www.su.se/english/about/working-at-SU/jobs?rmpage=job&rmjob=4290&rmlang=UK

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Vegetation is beneficial for fish recruitment

Fish in the hand of humans – a Baltic Seminar. At the Baltic seminar last week two interesting presentations were given, one about the linkage between benthic vegetation cover and fish recruitment and production and the other one the strong impact by large fishing companies.First, Johan Eklöf, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, presented the impact of cascading effects and the close interaction between rooted aquatic plants and seaweeds and fish recruitment of for instance pike and perch in shallow Baltic Sea bays. Shown both in more and more scientific studies and experiments.

1Large fish -plant benefits

In the first figure the positive effect of large fish is shown on the filamentous algae and how rooted aquatic plants benefit the recruitment of fish .e.g perch in shallow parts of the archipelago.

2PLants juvenlie pike

Fig. 2 shows that there seems to be a threshold of 20 % cover that is optimal for recruitment.This was followed by a presentation by Henrik Österblom, from Stockholm resilience centre about the large impact of big companies managing the fish stocks, both, on a global scale and in the Baltic Sea.

3fishmarket

The seminar ended with a panel discussion addressing the question if the fish stocks are in the hand of humans and if we will be able to find ways of sustainable use of and management of fish stocks.

4panel Balticseminar

Can the knowledge of the strong link between vegetation and fish recruitment be transferred to better management of shallow bays and coastal areas? Sofia Wikström and Gustaf Almqvist at the Baltic Sea centre, Stockholm University added to the discussion about the need of further improving our understanding of these complex ecosystems for a long-term sustainable management of fish species like pike and perch.