Vegetation is beneficial for fish recruitment

Fish in the hand of humans – a Baltic Seminar. At the Baltic seminar last week two interesting presentations were given, one about the linkage between benthic vegetation cover and fish recruitment and production and the other one the strong impact by large fishing companies.First, Johan Eklöf, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, presented the impact of cascading effects and the close interaction between rooted aquatic plants and seaweeds and fish recruitment of for instance pike and perch in shallow Baltic Sea bays. Shown both in more and more scientific studies and experiments.

1Large fish -plant benefits

In the first figure the positive effect of large fish is shown on the filamentous algae and how rooted aquatic plants benefit the recruitment of fish .e.g perch in shallow parts of the archipelago.

2PLants juvenlie pike

Fig. 2 shows that there seems to be a threshold of 20 % cover that is optimal for recruitment.This was followed by a presentation by Henrik Österblom, from Stockholm resilience centre about the large impact of big companies managing the fish stocks, both, on a global scale and in the Baltic Sea.

3fishmarket

The seminar ended with a panel discussion addressing the question if the fish stocks are in the hand of humans and if we will be able to find ways of sustainable use of and management of fish stocks.

4panel Balticseminar

Can the knowledge of the strong link between vegetation and fish recruitment be transferred to better management of shallow bays and coastal areas? Sofia Wikström and Gustaf Almqvist at the Baltic Sea centre, Stockholm University added to the discussion about the need of further improving our understanding of these complex ecosystems for a long-term sustainable management of fish species like pike and perch.

Advertisements

Two post doc positions on Baltic Sea research

The University of Helsinki and Stockholm University have entered into a strategic partnership where one of the key areas is Baltic Sea research. To strengthen this joint research initiative they are now inviting applications for two post-doctoral positions, one at Tvärminne Zoological Station (University of Helsinki) and one at the Askö Laboratory / Baltic Sea Centre (Stockholm University).

They are looking for candidates with experience and a strong interest in at least one of the following areas, with a particular focus on the coastal zone:
– biodiversity and ecosystem functioning
– benthic and/or pelagic biogeochemical cycles
– modelling of ecosystem processes in the coastal zone

The ideal applicants would have PhD’s in Marine Ecology, Ecosystems ecology, Biogeochemistry, Ecosystem modelling or related disciplines, have strong publication records commensurate with experience, and a demonstrated potential to obtain external research funds.
The successful candidates will be expected to be active in research and publication, advise graduate students, and engage in inter-disciplinary research and public outreach.
Comparative studies at both Askö Laboratory and Tvärminne Zoological Station are expected.

So, if you fit any of the above descriptions and love to be out in the field, this is a wonderful opportunity to experience two beautiful archipelagos of the Baltic Sea.

For more information on the positions, check HERE for the one placed in Finland and klick HERE for the one in Sweden.

Deadline for applicants is March 30th!

Askö boathouse early spring morningAskö boathouse early spring morning
Sunset at Tvärminne in FeburarySunset at Tvärminne in Feburary

Lectures on Ecology and Diversity of the Baltic Sea

As part of a PhD-course organized by BEAM (Baltic Ecosystem Adaptive Management), there were several lectures on the theme “Ecology and Diversity of the Baltic Sea”.

If you are interested in what the benthos looks like, what role the blue mussel plays, or want to know more about the planctonic life of the Baltic Sea, you will find the lectures by klicking HERE.

There is, of course, one or two lectures containing seaweed.

Gold medal to professor Lena Kautsky

Vice-chancellor of the University of Stockholm has decided to distribute the Stockholm University gold medal of the 8th size in ribbon to three persons who in various ways have promoted the University’s activities.

One of these is the BalticSeaWeed blog’s very own Professor Lena Kautsky.

The motivation reads as follows:
“Lena Kautsky, professor of marine ecological botany, is awarded Stockholm University gold medal of size 8 in ribbon for her deep involvement in marine research and education at Stockholm University, in national collaboration on marine environmental issues and sharing of knowledge to the public and decision makers. Her leadership of the Stockholm Marine Research Centre and Asko Laboratory has been a decisive part in the fundamental work resulting in Stockholm University’s new Baltic Sea Centre. ”

The medals will be awarded at the installation ceremony held at City Hall on September 27th.

The BalticSeaWeed blog, swelling with pride, will of course post pictures from the ceremony.

See also university’s website (in Swedish only).